The Real Issue Pressing Higher Education: ‘Worth Claims’

In “Why the Current Conversation About Higher Ed Misses the Majority,” Jayson Boyers states that the current national conversations on college education focus only on the “traditional 18- to- 22-year-old student demographic.”  He notes that while many people like to talk about issues surrounding low enrollment and limited access and lack of financial support, the … Continue reading The Real Issue Pressing Higher Education: ‘Worth Claims’

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Critical Thinking and Development of Understanding of Knowledge

As I begin this blog about “critical thinking” I thought that I would first provide my general orientation and perspective of the subject. By profession, I am an educational psychologist that was trained to think about educational topics such as “critical thinking” from a multi-psychological perspective that includes most fundamentally the developmental, learning, and assessment … Continue reading Critical Thinking and Development of Understanding of Knowledge

Teaching Toward Internationalization

The topic for this Tuesday’s Provisions session was Teaching Toward Internationalization.  The four presenters included Fr. Christopher DeGiovine, Dean of Spiritual Life, Sr. Sean Peters, Director of Mission Experience, Aja LaDuke, Assistant Professor of Teacher Education, and Terri Ward, Associate Professor of Special Education. First to present, Fr. Chris and Sr. Sean discussed their experiences … Continue reading Teaching Toward Internationalization

the Humanities: Can we be anything but a cultural study?

In “Cultural Studies: Bane of the Humanities,” David Mikics, a professor of English at the University of Houston, voices his opinion about the real purpose of higher education: to pursue truth all on your own by putting students in the driver's seat.  Mikics writes that students should be invited to challenge and decide if they … Continue reading the Humanities: Can we be anything but a cultural study?

“Whence all this passion toward conformity anyway?”

In “A Student Says No to Standardized Testing,” Taylor Lannamann talks about one facet of American life that can’t seem to escape the plague of standardization: education.  Lannamann takes us through growing up with educational standardization, beginning with the tests in middle school and high school, “one of the many ugly faces of No Child … Continue reading “Whence all this passion toward conformity anyway?”