Flipping Again

In our last post, Jenn and I provided reflections on our experiment with flipped library instruction.  In this post, I wanted to provide some additional context for library instruction, as it’s been my experience that many faculty are not quite sure what this entails.

needle

One-shot instruction: not always the best medicine.

The goal of library instruction is to build a range of competencies in students, often referred to as information literacy, which will give them a framework for engaging in college-level research. The opportunities for this type of instruction are presented in a less than systematic fashion — often delivered in response to classroom faculty who have research-based assignments.  Much to the dismay of many librarians, the reality is that we often engage in “one-shot instruction,” which — just as it sounds — happens once without much opportunity for follow up or assessment.

However, the range of new pedagogical strategies in the classroom presents new opportunities for rethinking library instruction.  Indeed both Jenn and I came enthusiastically to the idea that flipping library instruction could have some significant benefits.  The absence of a teaching lab in the library limits our ability (or conversely — challenges our creativity) to engage students in active learning.  I was excited to be able to be in the writing lab in Albertus, helping students as they worked through their assignment, which the assigned videos had modeled .  While this flipped instruction still can be seen as one-shot instruction, the fact that the videos serve as both pre-class assignments and as semester-long learning assets means that the normal limitations of a typical one-shot class are able to be overcome.

While there is a large body of research on the flipped classroom, there is yet to be a lot published that focuses on flipped library instruction.  The article referenced below provides a good overview, teasing out the benefits and challenges inherent in this relatively new form of library instruction.  Among the challenges many librarians would face:

  • Logistics.  It is difficult to plan for out-of-the-classroom work for a class that you have not yet met.   Fortunately, the goals of Jenn and I as Provisions’ fellows dovetailed nicely and helped eliminate the usual logistical issues; but on more normal one-shot requests, this issue would be one that could be particularly challenging.
  • Engagement.  It is always a challenge for a librarian who sees a class once during the semester.  Think substitute teacher and you have an idea of the challenges we face in engaging students and gaining their trust.
  • Time.  Creating and editing instructional videos, I quickly discovered, is very time-consuming.  I was fortunate to have a good deal of lead time, but this would not typically be the case.  However, I do think I would tend to get better — and quicker — with experience.

Part of what Jenn and I are discovering this semester through our work together and through an examination of the research on first-year students is that many of these students struggle to adapt to higher expectations and a new information environment at the college level.  One-shot instruction is simply one tool — and perhaps not the most effective one — to help first-year students build that “research toolkit” that will let them progressively improve their ability to find and utilize resources in their new and complex information ecosystem.

As I read more research on teaching first-year students and as I gain experience trying new approaches to library instruction, the suggestion that Stephanie Bennett offers in the concluding Provisions’ meeting from 2013-14 to “change just one thing” resonates strongly.  While there are many changes on the institution-level that can address the transitional needs of first year students — both generally and in the area of information literacy, the status of that larger process should not hinder or delay the individual efforts I can make to try to improve the things I do in the classroom.

W.B. Yeats once said

Life is an experiment.

I’m running with this, thinking library instruction is an experiment, and it’s an experiment processed one change at a time!

Document Referred to in the Post

Arnold-Garza, S. (2014). The Flipped Classroom Teaching Model and Its Use for Information Literacy Instruction. Communications in Information Literacy, 8(1), 7. [Read article]
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