November 15th Session Summary: Campus Community: Shifting Demographics and Student Identity

We are experiencing some technical difficulties with the audio, but are working to make it available. Sorry for any inconvenience, and thank you for your patience!


Our third Provisions session of the 2016-2017 year explored the theme of “Campus Community: Shifting Demographics and Student Identity. Presenters shared experience and expertise with the various topics pertaining to the theme, in which sought to explore the shifting population of college students (i.e. millennials, first generation). An audience of approximately 20 faculty and staff members attended to hear presentations by Maria Fast from the School of Education,  Kelly Meyer, the Director of Academic Advising, and Jack Pickering from Communications, Sciences and Disorders.

Maria Fast from the School of Education presented on the “Shifting Demographics and Student Identity”. Maria began her presentation by explaining her focus on helping in the development of her students’ identities, including their beliefs, values, ideas, and thoughts of themselves as ‘students’. Maria requires her students to complete a narrative reflection, in which allows them to explore a meaningful experience and connect it with the content of the course. Additionally, it serves as personal reference points so that they can explain how they see their own educational experience, can help to improve self-efficacy, and develop a sense of personal agency (i.e. how one can make a difference). In this narrative, students have the opportunity to reflect on what they have learned about themselevs, others, and their future careers from their specific experience. Maria explained how the narratives serve two main purposes, an assessment tool for understanding her students’  individual identities, and it is a learning tool for students through the reflection of content and their meaningful experiences. In concluding her presentation, Maria posed two questions to the audience, (1) how can we help students to evolve and change and (2) what can we do with those students who don’t value education or special classes?

Kelly Meyer, Director of Academic Advising, presented on “Campus Community: Shifting Demographics and Student Identity”. Kelly started his presentation by discussing the changing demographics in the student body (i.e. race, class, ethnicity) and the differences in student expectations and levels of preparation. Kelly focused on the increase in first generation (students whose parents do not possess a 4 year degree) and millennial students (born within the same 20 year time period). Kelly discussed that 30% of the Saint Rose population (consistent with other campuses) was comprised of first generation students. Some of the difficulties that first generation students face are that they may be twice as likely to leave after their 1st year, lack traditional support networks, lack information from family, lack the knowledge and skills to access support, and/or have competing commitments (1/3 may be lacking support networks and information expected). Millennial students may typically possess five characteristics in which include specialness/personalization, conventional motivation, protection, pressure, —and an achievement-orientation. These students are also potentially more at risk, have different expectations of relationships, and could typically benefit from transition assistance. Kelly posed the question, “how can we help students transition, resiliency, and achieve efficacy to be successful?”

Jack Pickering, Communications Sciences and Disorders, presented on the “Lessons Learned from Clinical Practice with People in the Transgender Community” Jack discussed his experience working with transgender students and clinician students. In Spring of 2008, Jack created a group program comprised of transgender students and student clinicians. Within this group, the transgender students are able to share their expertise and develop their sense of voice and communication. The sessions are held on Monday nights from 5pm-7pm and each begin with a relaxation and mindfulness centering exercise. Additionally, each session ends with a gratitude exercise, so essentially each session is beginning and ending in the same place-relaxation. Jack suggests that this provides a great way of building a community between the students. Throughout the semester, the clinician and transgender students work with one another about feelings and attitudes. In this process, the students are able to learn what it means to develop a relationship with someone who is different than them. The transgender students are then able to do class presentations in which allow them to practice their voice and communication, and allow them to educate others about what it means to be transgender. Additionally, the clinician students are able to reflect upon this experience and the importance of language, unconditional positive regard, and maintaining an environment in which is safe and welcoming to their clients.


Following the brief presentations, the floor was opened up for discussion and questions from the audience. Here are a few points and observations that arose from the discussion:

  • Imbalanced support from advisors
    • How to make sure all students are getting 100% support?
      • The new advisement model is an attempt to do so
  • Student engagement = Saint Rose difference
  • Connection with last session- connections of students with faculty
  • Decline in student writing
    • How do we fill in the gap with student abilities
      • Build skill- our job is to scaffold and help students achieve success
  • How do we build a positive outlook on academic supports?
    • Change frame of reference
  • How do you give good feedback?
    • Feedback is a craft
  • Is the First Alert system effective or not?
    • How can we frame the first alert so it is not as intimidating?

Campus Community: Shifting Demographics and Student Identity: November 15th Session

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In College of Tomorrow: The Changing Demographics of the Student Body, Joseph P. Williams discusses the projected changes in the demographics of future college students. Williams suggests that numbers of minority students attending colleges will increase within the years to come, preceding numbers of the current majority population. This provides implications for educators to prepare for the changes within the population of students in which will be served. The diverse population of students (including the different races and ages) within the college community may require changes in the overall culture of teaching.

Similarly, in A Looming Challenge in Higher Education: Our Changing Student a National Center for Education Statistics (NCES) report suggests that there will be increases in African American (25%) and in Hispanic (42%) college students, in comparison to a 4% increase in the amount of Caucasian college students. Additionally, there is a 50% predicted increase in the enrollment of students over the age of 25, typically referred to as ‘non-traditional’ college students. This also implies that educators across all levels (primary, secondary and college) must be aware of the possible risk factors (i.e. low income, higher high school drop out rates, and language barriers) that minority students might encounter. “Higher education leaders and policy makers must adjust to serve the students of the (very near) future, or risk failing in our responsibility to produce an educated citizenry and workforce capable of success in an increasingly global and complex economy. And that, in turn, will have profound implications for the future of our nation.”

In Four Trends Changing the Face of Higher EducationVicki Brannock (Director of the School of Extended Education at Brandman University) suggests that with the predicted shift in student demographics, educators must be prepared to also adjust to upcoming trends. Vicki predicts these four trends:

  1. The ‘flipped classroom’ approach of teaching
  2. Utilization of a neurological approach to teaching and learning
  3. Marketing the learning experience as opposed to content of colleges and universities
  4. Transition to competency-based strategies

Please join us for our upcoming November 15th session on “Campus Community: Shifting Demographics and Student Identity” Our esteemed presenters for the November 15th session include:

Maria Fast- School of Education
Jack Pickering-Communications Sciences and Disorders
Kelly Meyer-Director of Academic Advising

Provisions’ sessions are held from 12:00-1:15 in Standish A&B. All are welcome and no reservations are required. Free lunch and refreshments will be available! Hope to see you all there!🙂

October 18th Session Summary: Fostering Relationships With Students Outside of the Classroom

Click here to access the audio recording from this session (the volume of this is very low due to the way it was recorded, sorry for the inconvenience).

Our second Provisions session of the 2016-2017 year explored the theme of “Fostering Relationships With Students Outside of the Classroom.” Presenters shared experience and expertise with the various topics pertaining to the theme, in which sought to improve relationships with students outside of the classroom.  An audience of approximately 25 faculty and staff members attended to hear presentations from Kari Murad, Department of Biology, Claire Ziamandanis, Department of World Languages and Cultures and Ken Scott, Director of Community Service.

Kari Murad from the Department of Biology started off the session by presenting on her personal experiences from the Faculty-Led Program (FLPcourse, Food Microbiology. Kari explained the she has been in the teaching profession for eighteen years, and has participated in this FLP course for 9 years. Kari explained that this FLP course in Food Microbiology is offered to upper level science majors every two years, and encompasses a trip to France for two weeks during spring break. Kari emphasized the three main components of creating and maintaining successful relationships with students; (1) allowing enough time for the integration of knowledge and reflection of experiences, (2) providing opportunities for experiences in which are linked to academic content, and (3) providing opportunities to connect personal childhood experiences with the course content. The first assignment in Kari’s course requires students to tell their ‘story’ through a personal reflection using the quote, “Tell me what kind of food you eat, and I will tell you what kind of (wo)man you are.” In this reflection, students can share their experiences with traveling, cultural differences, food, etc. The study abroad portion of the course involves the exploration of France, including farms, vineyards, etc, and the opportunity to connect childhood experiences through reflection (shared each night at dinner with the group).

Next to present was Claire Ziamandanis from the Department of World Languages and Cultures. Claire began her presentation with the title of her presentation, There’s a bull on my balcony!. Claire explained how the tragedy of 9/11 impacted the rest of her teaching. She discussed how she was teaching about ‘ar’verbs in Spanish 101 when the news of what had happened reached her classroom, which promoted the reflection of the value of  ‘ar’ verbs in the world. Learning must meet the immediate needs of students and there must be contextualization for the synthesization of knowledge. Claire discussed how the first year leading an FLP course can be overwhelming and stressful, but provides great satisfaction once accustomed to the details and pace of the planning. Claire explained that while in Madrid, she has her students visit the same cafe every morning, as a way of entering the community by getting to know the workers in the cafe. To promote conversation, Claire assigns students different topics to discuss with community members of Madrid. The cultural activities in Madrid foster improvements in students language skills and confidence in using those skills. Additionally, FLP’s  provides opportunities for co-learning with students, pseudo-parent relationships with students, and mentoring other faculty to become FLP course leaders. Claire discussed some challenges with FLP’s, including the maintenance of academic focus, avoidance of tourism, connecting experiences to course content, and intercultural learning.

Last to present was Ken Scott, the Director of Community Service. Ken began his presentation by explaining his experience of being the director of community service for sixteen years, and a faculty member of the college for twenty six years. Ken described his experience with helping to recover the devastation from hurricane Irene. Ken arranged to have a baseball team of all male students to accompany him with the restoration of buildings destroyed from the hurricane. Ken discussed that 80-90% of the community service work is done with female students, as they tend to be more compassionate, mature, and sophisticated in terms of emotional intelligence. Ken emphasized the significant impact that a professor can have on first year college students through a personal example of his own college experience. Some of the work Ken and his students have done have occurred in Florida, NYC, and San Francisco, and involved habitat humanity, hurricane restoration, working with incarcerated women, and pockets of poverty…among many other wonderful missions! Although sufficient time and money is a challenge of such missions, the evolution of student confidence, individual voice, and sense of moral authority make service learning opportunities gratifying.

Following the brief presentations, the floor was opened up for discussion and questions from the audience. Here are a few points and observations that arose from the discussion:

  • Debriefing
    • How do you do this?
      • Evening reflections
      • Plan sessions
      • Online reflection
      • 6 hour mandatory debriefing
  • Line between academics/interpersonally
    • Based upon the specific group of students (what is the group mentality?)
    • Shift objectives to better fit the needs of the students
    • Refocusing to course objectives/academic agenda
  • Boundaries within student-teacher relationships

Please join us for our upcoming November 15th session on Campus Community: Shifting Demographics and Student Identity.” Provisions’ sessions are held from 12:00-1:15 in Standish A&B. All are welcome and no reservations are required. Free lunch and refreshments will be available! Hope to see you all there!🙂

Fostering Relationships With Students Outside of the Classroom: October 18th Session

How Can Educational Professionals Promote and Foster Student c85dac670af71f8c58eff72fb48a475eRelationships Outside of the  Classroom Environment?

According to  Maryellen Weimer, Building Rapport with Your Students  is an important factor for academic success. Research has indicated that positive student-teacher relationships can lead to various educational benefits, including increased student motivation, comfort level, quality of work, satisfaction, communication, and trust. Five important factors for promoting good student rapport are:

  1. Respect
  2. Approachability
  3. Open communication
  4. Care
  5. Postive attitude

The College of Saint Rose offers a Faculty-Led Program (FLP) in which students and educational staff  are able to study abroad in addition to academic coursework. This program encourages and fosters relationships between professors and students by providing opportunities for social interaction. The study abroad experience typically occurs for 1-2 weeks during the semester break, and allows students to get a taste of studying abroad without having to do so for an entire semester.

Ayona Datta discussed Why Student Field Trips Make an Impact using a real-world example from the the University of Leeds. Students working towards a Bachelor’s degree in human geography embarked on a field trip to Mumbai to explore the theme of global cities. Within that theme, students were able to explore the topics of “citizenship, identity, migration, belonging, transnationalism, social justice, bourgeois environmentalism, and everyday urban politics.” Ayona Datta’s believes that field trips can make an impact on student learning because they can assist with:

  • Professional research development and pedagogy
  • Provoking thoughtful discussion and various perspectives
  • Fostering and supporting the development of student skills
  • Fostering creativity in students

Below are additional references for promoting positive student-teacher relationships.


Please join us for our upcoming Tuesday, October 18th session on “Fostering Relationships With Students Outside of the Classroom” Our esteemed presenters for the October 18th session include:

Claire Ziamandanis-World Languages and Cultures
Kari Murad-Biology
Ken Scott-Director of Community Service

Provisions’ sessions are held from 12:00-1:15 in Standish A&B. All are welcome and no reservations are required. Free lunch and refreshments will be available! Hope to see you all there!🙂

September 20th Provisions Session Summary: “How To Incorporate Mission Into Our Pedagogy”

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** To access the audio recording of this session, click here! **

Our first Provisions session of the 2016-2017 year explored the theme of “How We Incorporate Mission into Our Pedagogy. Presenters shared experience and expertise with the various topics pertaining to the theme, in which sought to improve success for a diverse range of college students. An audience of approximately 25 faculty and staff members attended to hear presentations from Sean Peters, Director of Mission Experience, Angela Gordon, School of Business, and Jeff Marlett, Department of Philosophy and Religious Studies.

Sister Sean Peters, the Director of Mission Experience, kicked started the session by discussing a brief history about the College of Saint Rose. Sister Sean discussed how the college is essentially an organization that is about 360 years old, which began when it was founded by the Sisters of Saint Joseph of Carondelet. In 1650, the 6 sisters gathered in France and started a hospital (social services in those days). During this time, there were some wealthy people but the majority of people lived in poverty, experiencing illnesses like the plague. The sisters were concerned with the “needs of the times” and convened to discuss the resources they had and what they could do to respond to the needs of the community. During this time, lace was worn by all (men, women and children) so the sisters decided to teach young women how to make lace, thus making enemies of the wealthy. Following the French Revolution, religion was suppressed and the sisters were split up. In 1810, Mother Saint John sent the sisters to the United States, where they started a school for deaf children in Carondelet, Saint Louis. Sister Sean ended her presentation by reiterating  the theme that “we can do better together than we can do separately” which encompasses the values of the college of Saint Rose. “We have the resources to respond to the needs of the time, to educate the whole person, and we can always to things more effectively and efficiently together.”

Nest to present was Angela Gordon from the School of Business, on “Incorporating Mission into the First Year Experience.” Angela began by discussing the first assignment in the  ‘Business 101’ course, which requires the students to connect with the values of Saint Rose’s mission statement in a one-page essay. Angela then discussed a semester long assignment  in which students construct their own business plans using organizational awareness.  As part of the course, the students are taken on a field trip to downtown Albany (Pearl Street, State Street, Broadway), where they are instructed to “think of the population” and decide “what does this population need?” The students are then asked to create a developmental business plan that allows them to engage with urban environment. In doing this, the students will create a document proposing the set-up of a their businesses. The students will then be able to present their business ideas (on November 30th) to faculty and staff of the college, thus promoting involvement in and connection with the community.

Jeff Marlett, Department of Philosophy and Religious Studies, wrapped up the presentations by discussing his experiences with incorporating mission into teaching. Jeff discussed how he incorporates the values of the mission statement indirectly by teaching principles of catholic social justice-human dignity, common good, and solidarity (we are all part of the human family). Jeff emphasized the importance of solidarity and helping out others in need. In using the example of the flooding in Louisiana (“we are in solidarity with them”), Jeff described the overall principle of how local solutions work better first, and then larger services can be sought out when necessary. Jeff discussed how these principles then become the foundation for talking about the mission statement across disciplines. Jeff ended with emphasis on how it is important for educators and students to know the identity of Saint Rose, and why Saint Rose is different than other catholic campuses.

Following the brief presentations, the floor was opened up for discussion and questions from the audience. Here are a few points and observations that arose from the discussion:

  • The architecture that make a community are meaningless without understanding the core values
  • How to get students to consider how they fit at the college
    • Visit buildings to know what resources are available
  • Encourage students to understand the connection between mission/values and why they are attending Saint Rose
  • Research is important in deciding if you’re a good fit for a particular job/organization
  • How to foster an inclusive community

Provisions Reading Group

Hello all,

Provisions is proud to announce its’ new endeavor; Provisions’ Reading Group. The Provisions Reading Group is open to all faculty, staff, and administration at the college. The book club will meet every fourth Wednesday of the month in the Basement of the Hubbard Interfaith Sanctuary from 12:00-1:15pm. Feel free to bring a bagged lunch and/or refreshments!

We hope you can join us for a conversation about The Courage to Teach: Exploring the Inner Landscape of a Teacher’s Life, by Parker J. Palmer! (Copies of the book are available at the library- see Shawn Gilligan!)

Dates and reading/discussion goals:

  • 9/28: Introduction – Chapter 2
  • 10/26: Chapter 3 – Chapter 5
  • 11/30: Chapter 6 – Afterword

** Space is limited, so please RSVP to Liz Richards at richarde@strose.edu.** 


Provisions’ mission values teaching as an endeavor that requires ongoing inquiry and reflection. In keeping with this, the reading group aims to create a safe space for talking about our primary purpose here at the college: educa4ng students. Our teaching lives are clearly affected by our workplace environment, so these sensitive topics might also be a part of the conversatioon. We do request that all participants come with an open heart and mind.

September 20th Session Reminder

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Please join us for our upcoming Tuesday, September 20th (tomorrow) session on “ How We Incorporate Mission into Our Pedagogy.” Our esteemed presenters for the September 20th session include:

Angela Gordon-School of Business
Jeff Marlett-Philosophy and Religious Studies
Sean Peters-Director of Mission Experience

Provisions’ sessions are held from 12:00-1:15 in Standish A&B. All are welcome and no reservations are required. Free lunch and refreshments will be available! Hope to see you all there!! 🙂